Benefits of having an online coach

Affordability

– Not everyone can afford 1-1 sessions so online coaching is a more affordable way to work with an expert to achieve the results you’re striving for

Accountability

– Online coaches are just a click away and will often message you to see how you’re getting on. Knowing you have a coach will also motivate you to keep going. Have you ever sat at home with a cup of tea watching your television and thought, “I really can’t be bothered today”? What did you do? If you only have yourself to answer too, the chances are that you will continue to sit infront of your tele with a cup of tea but with a coach, in person or online, you are accountable to them and more likely to push yourself when you least want too. At Pride, we provide 24/7 communication, will check in regularly to see how you’re doing and will always take our time to talk with you about your strengths, weaknesses, motivation etc.

Results

– Everything is trackable and your coach will program you to the results in the same way they would if you were 1-1 with them. With an online coach, you are working with an expert in their field who understands how to gain the results even without seeing you in person, through their methodologies and principles of training and programming. At Pride, we guarantee you’ll get the results you want too. See Results & testimonials page for some of the results we have achieved with our clients.

Flexibility

– You don’t have to worry about fitting in a specific time slot for training or missing a session if something comes up, you can train on your own terms, in your own time and if something comes up, there’s no need to cancel, you can just rearrange your gym session for a later time without having the stress of matching times with a busy PT. At Pride, our club program is 4 days per week which offers flexibility for you to train around your own life. Our customised coaching plans are specific to you and written weekly to provide further flexibility, e.g. if you regularly train 5 days a week but a family wedding means you’re away the week after for 3 days, let us know and your program the following week will fit that in such as a 3 day week program.

On going support & communication

– How often do you realistically message your personal trainer? With an online coach, you have on-going support and communication with them regularly checking in on you and the line being open for you to contact them whenever. At Pride, we provide 24/7 communication; you can text or call whenever you need with anything including questions and video form checks and we will also check in with you regularly, especially if we haven’t heard from you.

Access to an expert

– Working with an online coach means you don’t need to be in the same town or even country as your coach any longer. You have access to an expert who can provide you with the best support, coaching and results and never even have to meet face to face. At Pride, we have a number of clients who live a distance from our gym but due to our on-going communication, video form checks and check in’s, the distance is no issue for our coaches and athletes. At Pride you will have a coach who lift to a high standard, is an expert in their field, practices what they preach and follows the same methodologies and principles in their and your training.

Added extra’s with Pride Performance customised coaching plan

– 1-1 session included where the athlete can get down to Pride
– Your coach will accompany you to all competitions where possible

Get online coaching with Pride

www.pride-performance.co.uk

Is weightlifting okay for children? Benefits you didn’t know about children and weight training

Children weightlifting? What? Doesn’t that stunt their growth?

Pride Performance Warrington child Member practicing her squat technique
9 year old Darcy practicing her squat technique with a Rogue War Bar

The involvement of children in weightlifting

The involvement of children (0-18) in weightlifting is continually questioned due to its safety yet British Weightlifting fully endorses weightlifting (Kite, Lloyd & Hamill, 2016) so which is it? The truth is, research has proven in the recent years that strength training for children is infact very beneficial! There are actually no reasons why children shouldn’t lift weights but there are a number of reasons why they should.

Benefits of children weightlifting and strength training

Over recent years, it has been sufficiently researched and proven that strength training practiced by prepubescent children is beneficial not only for children’s muscle and bone development but also is beneficial for their socialization, mental development and confidence (Faigenbaum at Al, 2009; Kite eh al, 2016; Coskun & Sahin, 2014). Recent studies have also shown benefits to increased strength, overall function and mental wellbeing in children with cerebral palsy (Lee et al, 2014). In fact, Haff & Triplett (2016) state that children as young as 5 can benefit from weight training. Pride Performance offer Pride’s Barbell Cubs (6-11) and Pride’s Youth membership and classes (11-17). The youth membership includes three weekly classes; weightlifting x2 and strength and conditioning as well as opening up Olympic Weightlifting Club up to both youth and adults. Pride also offers half price personalised coaching for 6-17-year olds.

Pride Performance Youth Member practicing his olympic lifting
11 year old Harvey practicing his olympic lifting

Hamill (1994) found two factors for the high safety level of weight training and weightlifting in children; a knowledgeable and qualified coach who puts in the time and effort to coach effectively and supportively (Faigenbaum et al, 2009; Kite et al, 2016) and the learning of skills with light weights to begin forcing the learning into a progressive approach (Keskinen, 2014) with correct grip and movements being learned with a stick prior to progression onto a barbell. At Pride Performance, both Heather and Andy are British Weightlifting qualified and we offer a range of equipment from Rogue War Bars which are essentially glorified PVC pipes with weightlifting markings, to 8kg and 12kg bars as well as technique bumper plates and progression is based on both abilities to lift the increased weight and on technique. In support of Kite et al (2016) who states that children who lift should be judged and scored on technique as opposed to weight lifted, Pride looks at both strength and technique when progressing a child to an increased weight. Even when a child / youth may be physically strong enough to lift an increased weight, they will not be allowed to progress if they don’t have their form and technique at the lower weight and will always decrease weight again if necessary.

 

Pride Performance Child Cubs Member practicing her olympic lifting
6 Year Old Cubs Member practicing her overhead squats

Haff & Triplett (2016) also state that coaches should talk to children on a level which they understand and when children are learning to weight lift. With Andy being a primary school PE teacher and Heather holding a post-graduate degree in early childhood and a postgraduate in therapeutic play studies, as well as childcare and multiple SEN qualifications therefore holding the knowledge not only of weightlifting but also of children, how to communicate and how to teach effectively as well as being willing to demonstrate proper technique for the children which they are teaching as the visual display can teach the athlete more than a verbal explanation (Keskinen, 2014). During all Pride’s Barbell Cubs (6-11) classes and youth (11-17) classes, the session’s coach will demonstrate each movement both at the beginning of the movement and throughout the session where appropriate and will also use video footage of the movements to break it down further visually.

Pride Warrington Cub's Child Class members practicing their olympic weightlifting technique
9 year old Darcy & 6 year old Hazel working on their snatch balances with Andy during cubs. (Plates set out ready for obstacle course)

Haff & Triplett (2016) also state that the coach should promote fun physical activity which compliments the strength training and encourages children to be active in their accessories. Pride’s Barbell Cubs implements this through splitting the 45-minute sessions into two parts. We focus on some lifting movements such as Olympic weightlifting and we do this in progressive stages teaching movement by movement with very light technique equipment for the first half of the session and then we use fun obstacle courses to encourage children to move in ways which improve mobility, power and speed and strength.  An example of one Cub’s obstacle course included an obstacle course where the children had to jump over the river so the crocodiles didn’t get them (box jumps, lower body power), walk over the slithery snake (balancing), run away with the pirate’s treasure (tyre drags, leg strength) and throw the hot stone (med ball throws, upper body power).

“I love it, I love to squat” – Darcy, 9 year old cub’s member

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Pride Youth Member – 15 year old Harry

Keskinen (2014) state that it is crucial that adolescents move enough while they are growing and going through puberty so what better way is there to do this than weightlifting? They can benefit their bodies natural changes whilst learning a sport which is not only fun but also competitive at an Olympic level. Kite et al (2016) argue that Physical Education departments should look to actively engage with the sport of Weightlifting during extra-curricular and curricular time in order to further develop its associated benefits and provide a better quality of life to youths overall which further enforces the importance and benefits of weight lifting and strength training for both children and youths.

“Pride Performance coaching had me achieve 4 north west powerlifting records in my class so, their dedication, passion and intelligent training is proven. And more importantly a joy to train with” – 16 year old youth member & North West Powerlifting Record holder, Max

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Pride Athlete Max Carr, U16 & U18 North West Powerlifting Records

Research has identified that weight training and weightlifting can provide children with both physical and psychological benefits including the reduced risk of injury and increasing muscle strength and power (Kite et al, 2016) with it actually being less dangerous than many other sports for high school age pupils (11-18) (Hamill, 1994) such as gymnastics, Taekwondo and even football. Weightlifting develops all athletic qualities needed in the majority of sports due to the variety of the movements and the muscle work which is needed to execute them (Keskinen, 2014). Strength training in youth football players induces performance improvement such as an increase in jumps and sprinting speed as well as a reduced rate of injuries (Zouita et al, 2016; Faigenbaum, 2009).

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Warrington U12 Football Club working on their deadlifts

What better way for your child to;

  • Help your child stay active
  • Help your child maintain a healthy weight
  • Increase your child’s confidence and self-esteem
  • Increase positive mental health through increased confidence in self
  • Improve overall fitness
  • Increase your child’s concentration in academic studies

Than allowing them to take part in an Olympic Sport which is fun, different and beneficial both physically in health, growth and other sport performance and psychologically in self-esteem and confidence?

“Strength training has made me feel strong & confident in myself as not only part of a supportive group of people, they have helped me to achieve my goals which I couldn’t have imagined reaching a year ago. I love what it has done to my confidence” – 17 year old youth member, Becky

“Within a short period of time, taking up weightlifting has helped me to increae my confidence and my strength. It is also really fun” – Pride youth member, 15 year old Matt

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17 year old Becky

Pride’s Barbell Cubs (6-11) Saturday 4:15pm – 5pm, Monday 4:15pm – 5pm

Youth Olympic Weightlifting Class (11-17) Tuesday & Thursday 4pm – 5pm
Free when a youth member

Youth Strength & Conditioning Class (11-17) Friday 4pm – 5pm
Free when a youth member

Weightlifting Club (open for youth and adults) Sunday 3:30pm – 5:30 pm & Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 7:30pm – 9pm

www.pride-performance.co.uk

Coskun, A., & Sahin, G. (2014). Two Different Strength Training and Untrained Period Effects in Children. Journal of Physical Education and Sport. 14(1), 42-46

Faigenbaum, A., Kraemer, W., Blimkie, C., Jeffries, I., Micheli, L., Nitka, M., & Rowland, T. (2009). Youth Resistance Training: Updated Position Statement Paper from the National Strength & Conditioning Association. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 0, 1-20.

Haff, G., & Triplett, N. (2016). Essential of Strength Training and Conditioning, 4th Edition. United States: Human Kinetics

Hamill, B, P. (1994). Relative Safety of Weightlifting and Weight Training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 8 (1): 53-57

Keskinen, M. (2014). Strength Training & Olympic Weightlifting for Children aged 12-15. University of Applied Sciences.

Kite, R., Lloyd, R., & Hamill, B. (2016). British Weightlifting Position Statement: Youth Weightlifting. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rich_Kite/publication/321039287_British_Weight_Lifting_Position_Statement_Youth_Weightlifting/links/5a0a1dda45851551b78d2ef9/British-Weight-Lifting-Position-Statement-Youth-Weightlifting.pdf 23/04/2018

Lee, D, R., Kim, Y, H., Kim, D, A., Lee, J, A., Hwang, P, W., Lee, M, J., & You, S, H. (2014). Innovative Strength Training Induced Neuroplasticity and Increased Muscle Size and Strength in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: An Experimenter-blind Case Study – Three Month Follow Up. Neuro Rehabilitation, 35(1), 131-136

Turner, A., & Comfort, P. (2018). Advanced Strength and Conditioning: An Evidence-based Approach. New York: Routledge Publishing

Zouita, S,. Zouita, ABM., Kebsi, W., Dupont, G., Salah, B., Fatma, Z., Zouhal, H., & Abderraouf, B, A. (2016). Strength Training Reduces Injury in Elite Young Soccer Players During One Season. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 30(5), 1295-1307

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Can weight training improve athletic performance? Warrington Town Under 12’s Wizards Football Club Visit Pride

Sports performance training for local team!

Having only got into strength training through training for playing basketball, Andy understands more than many the importance of strength and conditioning training for athletic performance. Pride Performance youth member, Harvey Lewis, is part of Warrington Town Football Club’s Under 12 Wizards so we offered his whole team a free strength & conditioning team training session! It’s something really different to their usual football practice and it’s fun too.

“It was a great new experience”

“The kids from Warrington town under 12’s really enjoyed their session at Pride Performance Gym. The session was fun and very informative for the boys. Thanks very much”

The team came to Pride today in place of their usual football training with bounds of energy and motivation to train which is what we love to see!

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Team Workout!

To begin, the boys warmed up, we did 3 rounds of 30m turn run, 10 air squat, 10 jumps & 10 burpees. Great to see the drizzle didn’t put anyone off!

We had some sore legs at the beginning of the session so we took this opportunity to teach the boys about foam rolling, stretching and mobility work! Great to see some hamstrings being rolled out.

We split them into 2 groups with either Heather or Andy and demonstrated the squat, seeing what they already knew and whether they had any previous experience. They then took it in turns to squat so we could make sure they were using correct and safe form! We also encouraged the boys to talk each-other through the techniques, coaching one another in their practices to re-enforce what they were learning!

“Training at Pride Performance has been one of my favourite experiences”

“It was very helpful and it was very fun”

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Squats, squats, squats

This was repeated with the deadlift to again ensure correct and safe technique was being used! For the majority of these boys, squats and deadlifts were completely alien but they took everything on board and give it their all!

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Deadlifts!

“Pride Performance were really helpful and over time could really help build my confidence”

“A brilliant opportunity for the lads to do something they have never done before and thoroughly enjoyed it”

Split into pairs, we used the rest of the session for a conditioning circuit

  • squats
  • box jumps
  • farmers walk
  • deadlift
  • tyre drags
  • duck walks

Me – “Has anyone ever heard of Eddie Hall?”
Boys – “WHO?!
Me – “World’s Strongest Man”
Boys – “OH yes, they flip tyres and drag trucks and run with big metal things. They’re really strong”
Me – “well guess what boys, we’re doing that today”
Boys – “YES YES” cue muscle posing and discussions about who’s the strongest!

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“It was very helpful and now I’m Hulk”

“Pride Performance has a range of activities to do and I could for sure recommend”

 

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Boys, you did absolutely brilliantly! Your determination and motivation was great and you put in everything you had! We absolutely loved having you down for a session and hopefully we will see you again soon!

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www.pride-performance.co.uk